WJT

JEWISH Kedainiai

X
Kėdainiai is one of the oldest towns in current-day Lithuania. The noble Radziwiłł family owned the town for a longer part of the town’s history.  The Jews settled in Kėdainiai at the beginning of the 17th century, when in 1627, the town's owner Krzysztof Radziwiłł allowed the Jews to settle around the Old market square. The first synagogue in Kėdainiai was mentioned in 1655, which stood in the Northern part of the Old market square. The Kacenelenbogen family made the town a center of Talmudic studies that even famous Vilna Gaon (Eliyahu ben Shlomo Zalman) studied here when he was young. It is believed that he was a student of a famous rabbi, Moses Ben Simeon Margoliot (1710-1780). Also, Moshe Leib Lilienblum (1843-1910) - a famous Jewish scholar and proponent of the Haskalah movement was born in Kėdainiai. Alma Pater, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commonsns At the end of the 19th century, Jews constituted about half of the total town population. High-density living space formed favorable conditions for fires that often ravaged the town. During WW1, the Jews of Kėdainiai were expelled from the town by the Tsarist regime. However, after the end of the war, many local Jews returned to their hometown. In 1923 about 2500 Jews lived in the town. The majority of the Kėdainiai Jews engaged in certain crafts and small trade, and even during the interwar period they dominated in the town's economic life. In 1941, when Nazi Germany occupied Lithuania, Jews from Kėdainiai and surrounding towns were forced to abandon their homes and were taken to the newly established ghetto. In August 1941, 2076 Jews were killed in nearby Daukšiai village.  The Kėdainiai Jewish community ceased to exist, however, the traces of former shtetl could be visible to this day. The town has a synagogue complex that consists of two synagogues: The Great Synagogue and the New Synagogue, which were built in the 18th and 19th centuries.  Since 2002, the building of the New Synagogue has been used as a multicultural center, where people have an opportunity to get acquainted with the history of the Jewish community and attend various cultural events.  In the cozy old town of Kėdainiai, there are many surviving Jewish buildings and objects in Kėdainiai, including the Jewish cemetery, Wulf Polones Pharmacy, the old 18th-century Jewish-house with the Sukkah, that remind us about the town's Jewish past.    

Get Inspired!

Get Google's city map with all of our info, sites and treats included!

SITES TO SEE

Your site could be here
View All Sites

TOURS OF Kedainiai

Your tour could be here
Your tour could be here
View All Tours

Jewish Style Restaurants

Restaurants

Krakių Bendruomenės Svetainė

Visitors to the site will be able to participate not only in programs of exceptional creativity, but also to taste the products supplied by local farmers and small producers. One of the main goals of the project is to promote cooperation between local food producers and local communities in the production, promotion and sale of their products by creating a public space. Encourage cooperation between food producers in the field of agricultural and food supply, combining transport, distribution, marketing, advertising and quality management activities, with the aim of ensuring that the products supplied reach the consumer quickly by developing the organization of the food supply chain. The head of the community center says that by organizing food for consumers according to the so-called short and healthy food chain, the consumer has a great opportunity to find out what is being bought, what and how it is made. Benefits for both the producer, who can create more added value, and the consumer, who gets food closer and healthier. It is both an education and a benefit to nature. Still, there is still a lot to improve here. "It simply came to our notice then. There are people in the area who produce butter organically and grow vegetables, but people do not dare to apply to the Veterinary Service for a permit. And we are without permission - no way. "Our people are hardworking, they only have a lot of internal fears, which is the biggest obstacle," Daiva is convinced. Currently, agreements are being concluded with thirteen farmers and small producers of Kėdainiai region. Erikas Augustinavičius, one of the largest beekeepers in the area, will supply honey and its products. Eggs, vegetables and spices will be bought from local farmers. And that’s just the beginning of the list. "Local produce is not just food. For example, the Ažytėnai community center has a sewing shop where she sews wonderful aprons and bags for spices. After all, it is also a local producer. Krakiškis Algimantas Vaiciekauskas weaves wonderful baskets and baskets. They can be used to add products and prepare business gifts for customers. Such a harmony is very beautiful. If you look more creatively, you can create a lot of wonderful things, ”said the community leader. According to her, the site will initially produce traditional food from the region, such as zeppelins with curd, cold beets with sourdoughs, and customers will be invited to try new and exclusive dishes and desserts during the tastings.

Your restaurant could be here
View All Restaurants See Kosher Restaurants

READ MORE BLOGS AND EBOOKS

World Jewish Travel Official May 13, 2022

The Jewish Story of Kedainiai

Kėdainiai is one of the oldest towns in current-day Lithuania. The noble Radziwiłł family owned the town for a longer part of the town’s history.  The Jews settled in Kėdainiai at the beginning of the 17th century, when in 1627, the town's owner Krzysztof Radziwiłł allowed the Jews to settle around the Old market square. The first synagogue in Kėdainiai was mentioned in 1655, which stood in the Northern part of the Old market square. The Kacenelenbogen family made the town a center of Talmudic studies that even famous Vilna Gaon (Eliyahu ben Shlomo Zalman) studied here when he was young. It is believed that he was a student of a famous rabbi, Moses Ben Simeon Margoliot (1710-1780). Also, Moshe Leib Lilienblum (1843-1910) - a famous Jewish scholar and proponent of the Haskalah movement was born in Kėdainiai. [caption id="attachment_37053" align="alignnone" width="1600"] Alma Pater, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commonsns[/caption] At the end of the 19th century, Jews constituted about half of the total town population. High-density living space formed favorable conditions for fires that often ravaged the town. During WW1, the Jews of Kėdainiai were expelled from the town by the Tsarist regime. However, after the end of the war, many local Jews returned to their hometown. In 1923 about 2500 Jews lived in the town. The majority of the Kėdainiai Jews engaged in certain crafts and small trade, and even during the interwar period they dominated in the town's economic life. In 1941, when Nazi Germany occupied Lithuania, Jews from Kėdainiai and surrounding towns were forced to abandon their homes and were taken to the newly established ghetto. In August 1941, 2076 Jews were killed in nearby Daukšiai village.  The Kėdainiai Jewish community ceased to exist, however, the traces of former shtetl could be visible to this day. The town has a synagogue complex that consists of two synagogues: The Great Synagogue and the New Synagogue, which were built in the 18th and 19th centuries.  Since 2002, the building of the New Synagogue has been used as a multicultural center, where people have an opportunity to get acquainted with the history of the Jewish community and attend various cultural events.  In the cozy old town of Kėdainiai, there are many surviving Jewish buildings and objects in Kėdainiai, including the Jewish cemetery, Wulf Polones Pharmacy, the old 18th-century Jewish-house with the Sukkah, that remind us about the town's Jewish past.    

Read More

#JEWISHKEDAINIAI

This error message is only visible to WordPress admins
There has been a problem with your Instagram Feed.
This error message is only visible to WordPress admins
There has been a problem with your Instagram Feed.